Stop Over Booking Yourself

Category: Business Advice

A few weeks ago I invited a handful of friends to a fitness self defense class on a Saturday morning. We’ve been having what we can only describe as arctic temperatures where the only way to venture out to your car is to involve several layers of clothing for warmth. That being said, just because it’s cold out doesn’t mean we shouldn’t workout. I envisioned gathering with a couple friends to work up a sweat, and perhaps finishing it off with a quick bite after.

Of those who were unable to attend, one was deciding if she had enough time to make the fitness class but leave early to attend a funeral. The scenario alone bothered me and I thought…. if this is the thought process, where would one need to schedule time to grieve, to process, or to simply be? Empty space on your schedule is not really empty. We, the busy movers and shakers out there, must allow buffers and transition time so that we can create and cultivate the magic that lets us be exactly who we are and do exactly what we do.

Safe to say you would not be fully present at one event if in the back of your mind you’re wondering the best time to dip out so you can avoid some of the rush hour traffic and get to your second event. I have been through this before and I know how it unfolds. Traffic is unexpectedly heavy this evening and for your commute to the next thing, every minute counts. You feel your heart rate rising and your breathing stalled as you contemplate what to do. Why can’t they drive faster? Ugh, I have to make this light! Should I call and tell them I will be late? Why, I ask, would it even make sense to book meetings so close together? What are you missing out on by giving yourself more time?

We tend to want to cram as much as we can into our days, so much so that the essence of the day or the things that you enjoy doing are sometimes under rug swept in favor of multitasking or more meetings and events. Are we missing out on anything by setting some boundaries and protected spaces for ourselves, for our work, for our families, for things that mattered? Is it wrong to start to train people, whether they be your friends or your work colleagues, on when you’re available and how to approach if someone wants to set up time with you?

Can time be sacred again? Can you look at a picture of something you love before making a decision to book an extra meeting or cocktail hour that takes you away. Can you schedule time for meditation like you schedule meetings for potential projects? Can you eliminate the rush you feel in yourself to see that in most cases, there is no rush?

I have noticed, even in myself, that there is a change in my being when I am running around, barely making appointments and forgetting to take deep breaths to get myself together first. Things pile up on each other and eventually they fall apart. But we play a role in adding to the pile. My new focus for 2018 and beyond is to make sure I factor myself more into the equation when it comes to my schedule.

I love talking with people and solving creative problems. I also love having uninterrupted time to design. And I love being able to take an afternoon off so I can go hit up a trail. And I love meeting my friends for dinner. And Points North is really good at supporting all the things I love.

unsplash-logoScott Webb